Semi-Private Dog Training in Springfield, MO

Semi-Private Classes

This is where Precious K9s differs from other dog training programs. Other training facilities allow 8-16 dogs in their classes. We offer classes with only four students and two trainers, allowing for lots of interaction between dog, owner, and instructor. 

Generally speaking, group classes are great for puppies, because they also teach social skills with other dogs. Learning to focus on their owners in a trainer-moderated environment, is a good way for puppies to learn to focus while playing with others. 

Dogs and Owners, Learning Together

Dog training is a constantly changing industry. Semi-private classes help students not only learn from their instructors, but also to learn from one another. If one dog is having an attention or barking issue, students can observe the proper training techniques should they need them in the future.

Every dog and every owner is different. Most of our human and canine personalities will play out in a semi-private class. While some may see these as distractions, we see them as training opportunities. In the same way that parents learn from other parents. Dog owners can learn from other dog owners.

In conclusion, semi-private dog training classes are rich in learning opportunities for dogs and humans. It also encourages owners to make a commitment to training when they have a group of people cheering them on. Who knows, you might even make a few friends along the way! Check out our registration page to learn more about our semi-private classes and workshops in Springfield, MO.

“When we punish our dogs and don’t let them know what they are doing that is good, they often focus on the timing of the punishment and don’t understand what to do instead of the undesirable behavior. They just do nothing or avoid looking. That may make the behavior stop, but it often times causes fallout such as snapping, biting, or worse. This behavior of doing nothing to keep out of trouble is a term we call learned helplessness. They don’t understand what they did wrong, so they just stand still and wait to see what someone is going to do next. If they aren’t noticed, maybe Dad won’t get stressed out… The fallout that often occurs, is just their way of trying to communicate without the signal you did not like the first time they told you.” Carrie Galvan, Professional Dog Trainer